garlands of shame

misery is still hip

dreampopinarnrtaxi:

Cocteau Twins - Tishbites DVD ( 2004 )

Intro/Menu Sound: Cocteau Twins - Dials 0:00
1 Pearly Dewdrops’ Drops 1:20
2 Aikea-Guinea 5:30
3 Pink Orange Red 9:30 
4 Love’s Easy Tears 13:29
5 Crushed 17:00 
6 Carolyn’s Fingers 20:17 
7 Cico Buff 23:22 
8 Iceblink Luck 27:05 
9 Heaven Or Las Vegas 30:30 
10 Evangeline 34:28 
11 Bluebeard 38:54 
12 Tishbite 42:46 

Rilkean Dreams:
13 Prelude 45:53
14 Rilkean Heart 46:41
15 A Capella Interlude 49:03
16 Half-Gifts 49:41
17 Epilogue 53:50

Extras:
18 This Mortal Coil — Song To The Siren 54:34 
19 Massive Attack — Teardrop (Live) 58:03

"Tishbites is a DVD collection of every Cocteau Twins promotional video plus some bonus features, all in a very high-quality, menu-driven format. Only 1,000 of these DVDs were pressed with a glass master. Each disc has a full-colour insert and full-colour on-disc printing. The original copies of this disc are all numbered individually."
"There are only two videos (Love’s Easy Tears, Pink Orange Red) on this DVD which are less than excellent quality, unfortunately better quality copies were impossible to locate. Everything else on this DVD is near broadcast quality."
Region code: 0 
Aspect ratio: 4:3 
Audio: Dolby Digital Stereo

(via assjb4)

libutron:

Lerista skinks and the evolution of limb loss
The Australian scincid clade Lerista (Scincidae) provides perhaps the best available model for studying limb reduction in squamates (lizards and snakes), comprising more than 75 species.
Among extant tetrapods, Lerista is exceptional in comprising a large number of closely-related species displaying prodigious variability of body form; several species possessing well-developed, pentadactyl limbs resemble typical non-fossorial scincids in body proportions, while many other species exhibit varying degrees of limb reduction and body elongation, including two that are highly elongate and entirely limbless.
Inferred phylogeny reveals extraordinary evolutionary mutability of limb morphology in Lerista. Ancestral state reconstructions indicate at least ten independent reductions in the number of digits from a pentadactyl condition.
An estimated age of 13.4 million years for Lerista entails that limb reduction has occurred not only repeatedly, but also very rapidly. At the highest rate, complete loss of digits from a pentadactyl condition is estimated to have occurred within 3.6 million years.
A relatively recent research about the phylogeny and evolution of Lerista, hypothesizes that an increase in the extent of seasonally dry and arid habitats coincident with the origination of the genus would have facilitated limb reduction and body elongation by furnishing an environment conducive to the adoption of fossorial habit.
The photo shows a Pilbara Flame-tailed Slider orRedtail Lerista, Lerista flammicauda, endemic to West Australia and found only in the Pilbara shrublands and the Western Australian Mulga shrublands.
References: [1] - [2] - [3]
Photo credit: ©Jordan Vos
Locality: The Pilbara, Western Australia

libutron:

Lerista skinks and the evolution of limb loss

The Australian scincid clade Lerista (Scincidae) provides perhaps the best available model for studying limb reduction in squamates (lizards and snakes), comprising more than 75 species.

Among extant tetrapods, Lerista is exceptional in comprising a large number of closely-related species displaying prodigious variability of body form; several species possessing well-developed, pentadactyl limbs resemble typical non-fossorial scincids in body proportions, while many other species exhibit varying degrees of limb reduction and body elongation, including two that are highly elongate and entirely limbless.

Inferred phylogeny reveals extraordinary evolutionary mutability of limb morphology in Lerista. Ancestral state reconstructions indicate at least ten independent reductions in the number of digits from a pentadactyl condition.

An estimated age of 13.4 million years for Lerista entails that limb reduction has occurred not only repeatedly, but also very rapidly. At the highest rate, complete loss of digits from a pentadactyl condition is estimated to have occurred within 3.6 million years.

A relatively recent research about the phylogeny and evolution of Lerista, hypothesizes that an increase in the extent of seasonally dry and arid habitats coincident with the origination of the genus would have facilitated limb reduction and body elongation by furnishing an environment conducive to the adoption of fossorial habit.

The photo shows a Pilbara Flame-tailed Slider orRedtail Lerista, Lerista flammicauda, endemic to West Australia and found only in the Pilbara shrublands and the Western Australian Mulga shrublands.

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©Jordan Vos

Locality: The Pilbara, Western Australia

(via assjb4)